NarrativeBear

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NarrativeBear,

But I don’t want to buy all new hardware! Thought MS was sustainable. Instead MS is BS.

NarrativeBear,

I just realised iTunes (store) is no longer a thing. Everything’s just streaming now.

Time to bust out the walkman

NarrativeBear, (edited )

I agree with your first statement, police are not therapists. They are not trained for this. They are basically a “sledge hammer” and everything is a “nail” per their training.

But, blambing the parents for calling for help should not be something that should be stigmatised in this way. Sure, maybe calling the police may not have been the best option, but the system is really failing us in general when people ask for help.

Calling a help line should really direct you to more appropriate service. Though this may not exist.

Edit: thanks for everyone that read the article (doing the lords work). The parents called a help line and the help line forwarded it to the police. So the systems for help failed the people they are designed to help in a way.

Also no need to downvote snownyte so badly guys!

NarrativeBear,

If a blind man were to ask a police officer for help crossing the road, the cop would probably shoot all the drivers.

NarrativeBear,

Very interesting, this even more so highlights how the system is somewhat failing or overburden in a way.

Even calling for assistance or help down the right channels can lead you down some unwanted or unseen directions.

I suppose that this same reason is why homelessness is as big of a issue, people don’t ask for help because it usually ends up being more of a burden then the situation they may already be in.

NarrativeBear,

The cops “we need go shoot this guy before he harms and kills himself” probably

NarrativeBear,

Its a shame when projects like these are cancelled. It really shows how “car centric” North America can be in that a simple pedestrian bridge is harder to build and costs more then one designed for cars.

In a time when we should really be shifting to a more “pedestrian focused” design and “livable cities” in general, project like these are in the correct direction.

NarrativeBear,

Your right, its sad because its true.

But when people walk across a pedestrian bridge society profits. Healthier population both physically and mentally. Greater happiness and less stress. Less pollution, pretty much all these benefits put less “burden” on peoples pockets financially, either both directly and indirectly through taxs.

Unfortunately probably all hard to quantify though.

‘Mini Holland’ scheme in Walthamstow hailed as major success as traffic falls by half, cycling and walking scheme is model for other cities (www.standard.co.uk)

Campaigners have called for “mini Holland” walking and cycling schemes to be introduced in towns across Britain after the first London pilot scheme produced dramatic results....

NarrativeBear,

True, the article may be old news, so here is an article celebrating the success of the same location after the last 10 years.

standard.co.uk/…/mini-holland-cycling-scheme-sadi…

Wish more cities would take note and move away from car centric urban and suburban design.

NarrativeBear,

Make them pay! Use the money to make cities less car dependent and more livable. Make public transits accessible and implement trams/subways/trains.

Increase neighbourhood densification at the same time, by taking space back from car infrastructure. ie. massive car parking lots that are impossible to walk across.

NarrativeBear,

Only way to make people change their ways, if it hurts the bottom line then action is usually taken.

This is why government regulation should be harsher, and fines should be proportional to company income.

If the fine is too low it just becomes the cost of doing business.

They Transformed a Nasty Stroad With Bus Rapid Transit (CityNerd) (www.youtube.com)

In Albuquerque NM, they not only built world class BRT infrastructure – they leveraged it to transform old Route 66 into a safer, more people-friendly corridor. Albuquerque Rapid Transit, or ART, is already a big ridership success, but there’s so much more potential. So today we’re taking a tour of the US’s only...

NarrativeBear, (edited )

Examples like these show its never to late to shift a city from a “car centric” design to a pedestrian focused design, with bus, tram, light rail, or subway routes.

Cities should be designed for people first, as opposed to cars first.

Pedestrian cities are also in a way cheaper in terms cost & mantinace of infrastructure, such as less traffic lights to maintain. Traffic lights are by far the biggest money sink for a financially struggling city, not to mention large parking lots that provides no return on investment.

NarrativeBear,

Condos need to be built for families, give me more three or four bedrooms in the city, and make it more affordable.

Condo developers can’t build these affordable three or four bedrooms though, because on average these layouts are about 20% larger in size to their comparable European unit layout. This is all to due to building code, and something called “point access layout” vs “common corridor layout”.

If we could get more families in the city buy making costs comparable in sq/ft to a single family home in the suburb we could make cities more enjoyable and give people a better sense of belonging, as opposed to just commuting in for a few hours.

NarrativeBear, (edited )

You mean German Canadians.

Though they would also need to be financially sound at the time they became a full on citizen, own a car (to make us of the day pass free parking), and be able to take the time off, to actually go see these parks.

Remembering the voucher kicks in on the day of becoming a citizen and then expires exactly in exactly 1 year.

I guarantee you if someone becomes a citizen in their teens and originally immigrated on their own with no family (which happens), they would more then likely not benefit from this, and probably not even have the means to see these parks in that one year window, and make use of the free day pass voucher for free parking…

NarrativeBear,

For parking…

NarrativeBear, (edited )

Day pass admission is 10-11$ for adults

Yearly passes cost around 135$

If you have 7 people in a car you can use that yearly pass for your group of 7.

Kids under 18 are free by default.

NarrativeBear, (edited )

That’s the one, thanks for finding a link.

Seems like it was 12-25 years of age and 150$ for a month of unlimited travel. It was a good deal but only available for 1 month, and i was already to old :'(

Would of been nice to use the pass and only sleep on the train as opposed to finding hotels.

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